Shakespeare's Grave

We walked to the church to visit Shakespeare's grave.

Here's the grave..

The tombstone of Shakespeare is inscribed with these words: 'Good friend for Jesus sake forbear, To dig the dust enclosed here! Blest be the man that spares these stones, And curst be he that moves my bones'. Shakespeare is thought to be buried 5 metres under the stone and his bones are still intact, as per his wishes.


In an attractive setting near the River Avon is the parish church where Shakespeare is buried ("and curst be he who moves my bones"). The Parish Register records his baptism in 1564 and burial in 1616 (copies of the original documents are on display). The church is one of the most beautiful parish churches in England.
Shakespeare's tomb lies in the chancel, a privilege bestowed upon him when he became a lay rector in 1605. Alongside his grave are those of his widow, Anne, and other members of his family. You can also see the graves of Susanna, his daughter, and those of Thomas Nash and Dr. John Hall. Nearby on the north wall is a bust of Shakespeare that was erected approximately 7 years after his death -- within the lifetime of his widow and many of his friends.
http://www.frommers.com/

Comments

  1. I wonder did he write those words for himself? The parish church is indeed beautiful from your photo.

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  2. Wow! Even in death, he was so grand. Beautiful church

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  3. hmm, i wonder what else did you see for Shakespeare?? i am not expecting just that statue at the entrance of the place and his grave?? sure there were more exhibits or at least his childhood house?? :)

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  4. Curst be the man who removes my bones... last time I had difficulty understanding... now after reading the old version of Bibles, I can have a clearer picture... :)

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  5. A piece of doggerel to hex any grave-robber. The entire history of the deification of the Stratford money-lender and hoarder smacks of bamboozlement. Nobody even in his family considered him a writer, no books, no instruments, no remembrances, no state burial at death, no testimonials. But his name did resemble "Shakespeare", the title-page name on a number of remarkable plays outlining the life and suffering of Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford. And the time came in 1623 for Oxford's relatives to publish The First Folio, with dedications to themselves. A put-up job to which unsuspecting history has sung Amen. But it is a nice church and town.

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  6. kinda nice to walk around there and observer the atmosphere

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  7. i no go in the shakespear tomb~ 18 pound+ right?

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  8. now i know a little about William Shakespeare...a lot more to learn about him.

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  9. I love the church, so old and beautiful characters. Shakespeare is so well known all over the world and his works have been translated to foreign languages too. I just wonder whether the meaning and understanding is the same in other languages.

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  10. Good evening wenn!

    Shakespeare's grave! Wow! Must be here for a loooong time already!

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  11. Nice church, what a great place to visit!!! =]

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